ComicsAlliance

Sep 23

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER GIULIE SPEZIANI
By Janelle Asselin
In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”

Writer Giulie Speziani has worked on a few different projects, including By The Slice and Golden Age with artist Cecilia Latella. You can see her in person this weekend at Long Beach Comic-Con on the Hire This Woman panel at 3:30pm on Sunday, September 28th, along with other past and future featured creators!
READ MORE

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER GIULIE SPEZIANI

By Janelle Asselin

In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”

Writer Giulie Speziani has worked on a few different projects, including By The Slice and Golden Age with artist Cecilia Latella. You can see her in person this weekend at Long Beach Comic-Con on the Hire This Woman panel at 3:30pm on Sunday, September 28th, along with other past and future featured creators!

READ MORE

GOTHAM’S FINEST: NINE GREAT COMIC BOOKS ABOUT JIM GORDON AND THE GOTHAM CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT
By Chris Sims
This week marks the premiere of Gotham, the  new Fox television show focusing on Jim Gordon’s first year as a cop in Batman’s hometown, and the origins of young Bruce Wayne and the people who will one day become the greatest enemies of his war on crime. That the show exists at all is a testament to how strong Jim Gordon and the rest of the Gotham city Police Department are as heroes in their own rights.

So if Gotham has you in the mood to read about Gordon, Harvey Bullock and the rest of the GCPD — or if you just want to dive into some solid Batman comics where the spotlight isn’t entirely on the Dark Knight — then I’ve got some suggestions for great comics about Gotham’s top cops!
READ MORE

GOTHAM’S FINEST: NINE GREAT COMIC BOOKS ABOUT JIM GORDON AND THE GOTHAM CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT

By Chris Sims

This week marks the premiere of Gotham, the  new Fox television show focusing on Jim Gordon’s first year as a cop in Batman’s hometown, and the origins of young Bruce Wayne and the people who will one day become the greatest enemies of his war on crime. That the show exists at all is a testament to how strong Jim Gordon and the rest of the Gotham city Police Department are as heroes in their own rights.

So if Gotham has you in the mood to read about Gordon, Harvey Bullock and the rest of the GCPD — or if you just want to dive into some solid Batman comics where the spotlight isn’t entirely on the Dark Knight — then I’ve got some suggestions for great comics about Gotham’s top cops!

READ MORE

FINALLY: ‘BEWARE THE BATMAN’ AND THE COMPLETE ‘YOUNG JUSTICE’ SEASON 1 COMING TO BLU-RAY
By Matt D. Wilson
Based on the DC Comics superheroes, Beware the Batman and Young Justice are two examples of animated shows that haven’t exactly been treated well. Both Warner Bros. series were unceremoniously pulled from Cartoon Network, only to return to burn off episodes (in some cases, in the middle of the night).

Treatment like that would seemingly indicated little commitment to release the series on home video, but never fear, fans. Warner Archive announced this week that it will release the second part of Beware the Batman’s first season and the complete first season of Young Justice on Blu-Ray. Along with those, the company will also offer the full second season of Batman: The Brave and the Bold, and the classic 1960s Aquaman animated series will be available through Warner Archive’s streaming service.

All the Blu-Rays will be available Sept. 30; the Aquaman cartoon is up and available for streaming right now.
READ MORE

FINALLY: ‘BEWARE THE BATMAN’ AND THE COMPLETE ‘YOUNG JUSTICE’ SEASON 1 COMING TO BLU-RAY

By Matt D. Wilson

Based on the DC Comics superheroes, Beware the Batman and Young Justice are two examples of animated shows that haven’t exactly been treated well. Both Warner Bros. series were unceremoniously pulled from Cartoon Network, only to return to burn off episodes (in some cases, in the middle of the night).

Treatment like that would seemingly indicated little commitment to release the series on home video, but never fear, fans. Warner Archive announced this week that it will release the second part of Beware the Batman’s first season and the complete first season of Young Justice on Blu-Ray. Along with those, the company will also offer the full second season of Batman: The Brave and the Bold, and the classic 1960s Aquaman animated series will be available through Warner Archive’s streaming service.

All the Blu-Rays will be available Sept. 30; the Aquaman cartoon is up and available for streaming right now.

READ MORE

FEAR AS A WAY OF LIFE: WHY WOMEN IN COMICS DON’T ‘JUST REPORT’ SEXUAL HARASSMENT
By Juliet Kahn
“If the harassment is so bad, why don’t women just report it?”

“I want to believe these women, but if they’re not willing to come forth and put their name to these accusations, I just can’t.”

“These claims of harassment are all so overblown. I never see it happening.”

I have been a woman in the comics industry for a few months now. It has been wonderful. It has also been terrifying.

Terrifying in a way I’m used to, though. When you grow up enveloped in the miasma of “tits or GTFO,” “attention whore,” and “fake geek girl,” fear becomes the price you pay to enjoy your hobbies. You don’t even think of it as fear most of the time.

Sometimes you join in the fear mongering yourself, enjoying the a**hole glamour of not being too pussy to call another girl a slut. Sometimes you hide in woman-heavy spaces, which go maligned elsewhere (“Tumblrinas!”) but do a pretty solid job of keeping you safe. The fear comes back eventually, though, as a slew of graphic rape threats or a simple joke about “feminazis” you are expected to chuckle along with. It might be in response to a screed worthy of Andrea Dworkin—or maybe you just tweeted something about disliking Guardians of the Galaxy. What matters is that you were a woman with an opinion on the internet, and now you must be punished. You must be made to fear.

Fear is also meant to keep us safe from sexual harassment, assault and abuse. We’re told not to stay out too late, not to go out alone, not to drink, not to lead anyone on, not to go home with anyone, not to ever feel safe in any situation that a man might take advantage of. If you fear the (implicitly common) worst from the men around you, you will escape it. When harassment, assault, and abuse take place anyway, fear is often a distinctly purposeful element of the encounter. Sometimes, this is subtle—it might take place in a deliberately secluded spot, or the perpetrator might be in a position of power over your future. Or, in the case of rape-and-death-threat style online harassment, the naked point of it might be to instill fear. After the harassment, assault, or abuse has taken place, it is fear that keeps women from speaking out. Fear of being branded the whiny bitch, of enduring the Anita Sarkeesian experience, or having one’s career torpedoed by a thousand nerds high on a lifetime’s worth of entitlement and vitriol.

Fear is what keeps us silent. Fear is what keeps men from understanding the ubiquity of these experiences. Fear is what keeps us from attaching a name to our allegations. Fear is what makes harassment, assault, and abuse a rite of passage for women in this industry and the world beyond. Fear, in this society, is what makes you a woman. And fear, in extinguishing discussion of its cruelties, keeps us from understanding its nature and better dismantling it.
READ MORE

FEAR AS A WAY OF LIFE: WHY WOMEN IN COMICS DON’T ‘JUST REPORT’ SEXUAL HARASSMENT

By Juliet Kahn

“If the harassment is so bad, why don’t women just report it?”

“I want to believe these women, but if they’re not willing to come forth and put their name to these accusations, I just can’t.”

“These claims of harassment are all so overblown. I never see it happening.”

I have been a woman in the comics industry for a few months now. It has been wonderful. It has also been terrifying.

Terrifying in a way I’m used to, though. When you grow up enveloped in the miasma of “tits or GTFO,” “attention whore,” and “fake geek girl,” fear becomes the price you pay to enjoy your hobbies. You don’t even think of it as fear most of the time.

Sometimes you join in the fear mongering yourself, enjoying the a**hole glamour of not being too pussy to call another girl a slut. Sometimes you hide in woman-heavy spaces, which go maligned elsewhere (“Tumblrinas!”) but do a pretty solid job of keeping you safe. The fear comes back eventually, though, as a slew of graphic rape threats or a simple joke about “feminazis” you are expected to chuckle along with. It might be in response to a screed worthy of Andrea Dworkin—or maybe you just tweeted something about disliking Guardians of the Galaxy. What matters is that you were a woman with an opinion on the internet, and now you must be punished. You must be made to fear.

Fear is also meant to keep us safe from sexual harassment, assault and abuse. We’re told not to stay out too late, not to go out alone, not to drink, not to lead anyone on, not to go home with anyone, not to ever feel safe in any situation that a man might take advantage of. If you fear the (implicitly common) worst from the men around you, you will escape it. When harassment, assault, and abuse take place anyway, fear is often a distinctly purposeful element of the encounter. Sometimes, this is subtle—it might take place in a deliberately secluded spot, or the perpetrator might be in a position of power over your future. Or, in the case of rape-and-death-threat style online harassment, the naked point of it might be to instill fear. After the harassment, assault, or abuse has taken place, it is fear that keeps women from speaking out. Fear of being branded the whiny bitch, of enduring the Anita Sarkeesian experience, or having one’s career torpedoed by a thousand nerds high on a lifetime’s worth of entitlement and vitriol.

Fear is what keeps us silent. Fear is what keeps men from understanding the ubiquity of these experiences. Fear is what keeps us from attaching a name to our allegations. Fear is what makes harassment, assault, and abuse a rite of passage for women in this industry and the world beyond. Fear, in this society, is what makes you a woman. And fear, in extinguishing discussion of its cruelties, keeps us from understanding its nature and better dismantling it.

READ MORE

Sep 22

‘PROJECT GREENLIGHT’ SHORT FILM ILLUSTRATES THE ARGUMENT AGAINST SEXIST SUPERHEROINE COSTUMES
By Matt D. Wilson
Over the past few years, comics fans have been embroiled in a debate over the double standard that applies to superhero costumes. While men’s costumes are increasingly depicted as totally functional and conveying strength, women’s costumes remain what they’ve been for decades: skimpy, overtly sexualized, and all too often, anything but what would be practical for the purposes of patrolling the streets and fighting crime.

Filmmaker Luke Patton’s short film “Sexy Superhero” faces that debate head-on and makes something really funny out of it.
MORE

‘PROJECT GREENLIGHT’ SHORT FILM ILLUSTRATES THE ARGUMENT AGAINST SEXIST SUPERHEROINE COSTUMES

By Matt D. Wilson

Over the past few years, comics fans have been embroiled in a debate over the double standard that applies to superhero costumes. While men’s costumes are increasingly depicted as totally functional and conveying strength, women’s costumes remain what they’ve been for decades: skimpy, overtly sexualized, and all too often, anything but what would be practical for the purposes of patrolling the streets and fighting crime.

Filmmaker Luke Patton’s short film “Sexy Superhero” faces that debate head-on and makes something really funny out of it.

MORE

WHO RUN THE WORLD? GIRLS: NINE UNBEATABLE ALL-LADY JUSTICE LEAGUE LINE-UPS
By Benito Cereno
If you spend as much time thinking about comics as I do, you probably find yourself creating hypothetical-based thought experiments about super-team line-ups and such. Usually I only share them with Chris Sims, who then goes on to turn them into an Ask Chris and get paid for my idea. [cough]

But a few weeks ago, I took to Twitter to ask people who they would recruit for an all-female, seven-member Justice League. The response at the time was great, with lots of interesting variation in potential team rosters, but then the idea got a bump again when artists started posting drawings of their ideal Justice Ladies teams on Twitter and Tumblr.

I’ve collected nine such line-ups, including my own and those of Evan ‘Doc’ Shaner, Kris Anka and more, which kicked everything off.

READ MORE

WHO RUN THE WORLD? GIRLS: NINE UNBEATABLE ALL-LADY JUSTICE LEAGUE LINE-UPS

By Benito Cereno

If you spend as much time thinking about comics as I do, you probably find yourself creating hypothetical-based thought experiments about super-team line-ups and such. Usually I only share them with Chris Sims, who then goes on to turn them into an Ask Chris and get paid for my idea. [cough]

But a few weeks ago, I took to Twitter to ask people who they would recruit for an all-female, seven-member Justice League. The response at the time was great, with lots of interesting variation in potential team rosters, but then the idea got a bump again when artists started posting drawings of their ideal Justice Ladies teams on Twitter and Tumblr.

I’ve collected nine such line-ups, including my own and those of Evan ‘Doc’ Shaner, Kris Anka and more, which kicked everything off.

READ MORE

BEST COSPLAY EVER (THIS WEEK): SAVAGE LAND ROGUE, QUICKSILVER, FROZEN, BARBARELLA AND MORE
Compiled by Betty Felon
Although cosplay has been present for decades within the comics, anime, and sci-fi/fantasy fandoms, social media has played an integral role in the thriving communities of costuming that exist, such as Cosplay.com and the Superhero Costuming Forum. Over the years, the cosplay community has evolved into a creative outlet for many fans to establish and showcase some impressive feats of homemade disguise, craftsmanship, and sartorial superheroics at conventions. In honor of the caped crusaders of the convention scene, ComicsAlliance has created Best Cosplay Ever (This Week), an ongoing collection of some of the most impeccable, creative, and clever costumes that we’ve discovered and assembled into a super-showcase of pure fan-devoted talent.


Above: Quicksilver cosplayed by Arthur Kirkland, photographed by Knightmare6 Photography


SEE THIS WEEK’S COSPLAY AT COMICS ALLIANCE

BEST COSPLAY EVER (THIS WEEK): SAVAGE LAND ROGUE, QUICKSILVER, FROZEN, BARBARELLA AND MORE

Compiled by Betty Felon

Although cosplay has been present for decades within the comics, anime, and sci-fi/fantasy fandoms, social media has played an integral role in the thriving communities of costuming that exist, such as Cosplay.com and the Superhero Costuming Forum. Over the years, the cosplay community has evolved into a creative outlet for many fans to establish and showcase some impressive feats of homemade disguise, craftsmanship, and sartorial superheroics at conventions. In honor of the caped crusaders of the convention scene, ComicsAlliance has created Best Cosplay Ever (This Week), an ongoing collection of some of the most impeccable, creative, and clever costumes that we’ve discovered and assembled into a super-showcase of pure fan-devoted talent.

Above: Quicksilver cosplayed by Arthur Kirkland, photographed by Knightmare6 Photography

SEE THIS WEEK’S COSPLAY AT COMICS ALLIANCE

THE X-MEN EPISODE GUIDE 5×06: BLOODLINES
By Chris Sims
The early ’90s were spoiled for choice when it came to comic book adaptations. Not only was Batman: The Animated Series on the air, but X-Men led Marvel’s push to get on the small screen, diving right into the often convoluted continuity of everyone’s favorite mutants, luring in a generation of fans, and paving the way for cartoons to follow. That’s why we’ve set out to review every single episode of the ’90s X-Men animated series.

This week, Jubilee actually compares the events of her life to a soap opera, just in case you didn’t get that before now.
READ MORE

THE X-MEN EPISODE GUIDE 5×06: BLOODLINES

By Chris Sims

The early ’90s were spoiled for choice when it came to comic book adaptations. Not only was Batman: The Animated Series on the air, but X-Men led Marvel’s push to get on the small screen, diving right into the often convoluted continuity of everyone’s favorite mutants, luring in a generation of fans, and paving the way for cartoons to follow. That’s why we’ve set out to review every single episode of the ’90s X-Men animated series.

This week, Jubilee actually compares the events of her life to a soap opera, just in case you didn’t get that before now.

READ MORE

COMICS ALLIANCE PRESENTS ‘KATE OR’DIE’: YOUR ULTIMATE HALLOWEEN COSTUME DECIDER
By Kate Leth
Welcome to the latest episode of ComicsAlliance Presents “Kate or Die,” a series of exclusive comic strips created by one of our favorite cartoonists, Kate Leth! In this episode, Kate creates an interactive tool to help determine your costume for Halloween next month. Simply download the PDF, cut it out and roll. You’re welcome.
READ MORE KATE OR DIE AT COMICS ALLIANCE

COMICS ALLIANCE PRESENTS ‘KATE OR’DIE’: YOUR ULTIMATE HALLOWEEN COSTUME DECIDER

By Kate Leth

Welcome to the latest episode of ComicsAlliance Presents “Kate or Die,” a series of exclusive comic strips created by one of our favorite cartoonists, Kate Leth! In this episode, Kate creates an interactive tool to help determine your costume for Halloween next month. Simply download the PDF, cut it out and roll. You’re welcome.

READ MORE KATE OR DIE AT COMICS ALLIANCE

A MODEST AND BELATED BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION FOR MIKE MIGNOLA
By Patrick A. Reed
If you were to pull a random sampling of professionals from across the comics industry and poll them on their favorite modern-day creators, Mike Mignola’s name would doubtlessly rank near the top. Since he burst on the scene at Marvel in the early 1980s, pencilling an obscure limited series about a talking space raccoon, he’s matured brilliantly – from his seminal work at DC Comics (pencilling books including World Of Krypton, Cosmic Odyssey, and Batman: Gotham By Gaslight), to his work at Topps, Marvel, and other companies in the early ’90s (on Ironwolf, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, various X-books, and many other titles), to his move into creator-owned comics with the mighty Hellboy, he’s maintained a unique voice and an immediately recognizable art style, bettering himself with each successive project, evolving and refining his voice at every opportunity.

Mignola’s vision is of course best expressed by the empire of “Hellboy-verse” comics, which includes the titles B.P.R.D. Hell On Earth, Abe Sapien, Lobster Johnson, Witchfinder, and even inspiring a kid-friendly spin-off series Itty Bitty Hellboy. They’re all set in his own supernatural horror-heroic world that blends spooky atmospherics and bizarre humor to create some of the best, most distinctive American comics ever put to paper.

Outside of comics, Mignola’s designed for animation (Atlantis: The Lost Empire), created concept art for a number of acclaimed films (Pan’s Labyrinth, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Blade II), and even branched out into writing and illustrating prose novels (Baltimore, Joe Golem). His own creations have been adapted to both live-action films (Hellboy and Hellboy II: The Golden Army), and cartoons (Hellboy: Sword Of Storms, Hellboy: Blood And Iron, The Amazing Screw-On Head).

Whether it’s baby Hellboy eating a forbidden breakfast, a snake and a magician flying kites, or a robotic super-spy with a detachable head in the employ of President Lincoln, there’s a dry-yet-absurd tone to Mignola stories that drips with the glee of innovation and possibility, yet manages to keep it all contained within straight-faced third-person storytelling. And so, today, a few days after his 54th birthday, we’re excited to celebrate Mike Mignola’s career with a few fellow fans (who also happen to be notable comic-makers in their own right).
SEE THE TRIBUTES AT COMICS ALLIANCE

A MODEST AND BELATED BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION FOR MIKE MIGNOLA

By Patrick A. Reed

If you were to pull a random sampling of professionals from across the comics industry and poll them on their favorite modern-day creators, Mike Mignola’s name would doubtlessly rank near the top. Since he burst on the scene at Marvel in the early 1980s, pencilling an obscure limited series about a talking space raccoon, he’s matured brilliantly – from his seminal work at DC Comics (pencilling books including World Of Krypton, Cosmic Odyssey, and Batman: Gotham By Gaslight), to his work at Topps, Marvel, and other companies in the early ’90s (on Ironwolf, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, various X-books, and many other titles), to his move into creator-owned comics with the mighty Hellboy, he’s maintained a unique voice and an immediately recognizable art style, bettering himself with each successive project, evolving and refining his voice at every opportunity.

Mignola’s vision is of course best expressed by the empire of “Hellboy-verse” comics, which includes the titles B.P.R.D. Hell On EarthAbe SapienLobster Johnson, Witchfinder, and even inspiring a kid-friendly spin-off series Itty Bitty Hellboy. They’re all set in his own supernatural horror-heroic world that blends spooky atmospherics and bizarre humor to create some of the best, most distinctive American comics ever put to paper.

Outside of comics, Mignola’s designed for animation (Atlantis: The Lost Empire), created concept art for a number of acclaimed films (Pan’s Labyrinth, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Blade II), and even branched out into writing and illustrating prose novels (Baltimore, Joe Golem). His own creations have been adapted to both live-action films (Hellboy and Hellboy II: The Golden Army), and cartoons (Hellboy: Sword Of Storms, Hellboy: Blood And Iron, The Amazing Screw-On Head).

Whether it’s baby Hellboy eating a forbidden breakfast, a snake and a magician flying kites, or a robotic super-spy with a detachable head in the employ of President Lincoln, there’s a dry-yet-absurd tone to Mignola stories that drips with the glee of innovation and possibility, yet manages to keep it all contained within straight-faced third-person storytelling. And so, today, a few days after his 54th birthday, we’re excited to celebrate Mike Mignola’s career with a few fellow fans (who also happen to be notable comic-makers in their own right).

SEE THE TRIBUTES AT COMICS ALLIANCE