ComicsAlliance

Apr 18

Have we ever seen a cosplaying car? #wondercon

Have we ever seen a cosplaying car? #wondercon

Amazing Batman 66 thing

Amazing Batman 66 thing

Amazing Catwoman 66 thing

Amazing Catwoman 66 thing

Jock shoes at #WonderCon @jock4twenty

Jock shoes at #WonderCon @jock4twenty

And more

And more

FUNNY ‘AVENGERS’ MANGA INTRODUCES EARTH’S MIGHTIEST HEROES TO JAPAN

On the off chance that you thought there was anywhere you could go to escape the presence of The Avengers now that they were the stars of a series of films that have taken in roughly 48 trillion dollars, don’t fret: They are everywhere. Or, to be slightly more accurate, they’re now in Japan, thanks to a series of comics designed to introduce Japanese children to Marvel’s team of superheroes.

Created by Fujiminosuke Yorozuya as part of an effort to promote Marvel and Toie’s new Marvel Disk Wars: The Avengers anime, Marvel Avengers ran as a twelve-page one-shot in Monthly Korokoro Comic for kids, introducing Captain America, the Wasp, Iron Man, Thor, the Hulk and Spider-Man to younger readers in a lighthearted comedy.
SEE MORE

FUNNY ‘AVENGERS’ MANGA INTRODUCES EARTH’S MIGHTIEST HEROES TO JAPAN

On the off chance that you thought there was anywhere you could go to escape the presence of The Avengers now that they were the stars of a series of films that have taken in roughly 48 trillion dollars, don’t fret: They are everywhere. Or, to be slightly more accurate, they’re now in Japan, thanks to a series of comics designed to introduce Japanese children to Marvel’s team of superheroes.

Created by Fujiminosuke Yorozuya as part of an effort to promote Marvel and Toie’s new Marvel Disk Wars: The Avengers anime, Marvel Avengers ran as a twelve-page one-shot in Monthly Korokoro Comic for kids, introducing Captain America, the Wasp, Iron Man, Thor, the Hulk and Spider-Man to younger readers in a lighthearted comedy.

SEE MORE

Apr 17

[video]

4/20 SPECIAL: A COMPLETE HISTORY OF ‘FASTLANE,’ MARVEL’S AMAZING ANTI-MARIJUANA COMIC
By Chris Sims
If you were reading Marvel Comics in 1999, you read Fastlane. For four solid months, it was absolutely unavoidable, an eight-page anti-marijuana insert that would pop up right in the middle of every single Marvel Comic to let you know about the dangers of weed, a drug that was glorified in the media and would lead users to a dangerous world of addiction and deadly hallucinations that was so over the top even the producers of Dragnetthought that maybe they should tone it down a little. And if you’re a certain kind of person who was reading Marvel Comics in the ’90s, you actually kind of love it.

I mean, I do. And that’s why, with 4/20 and all its attendant celebrations coming up this weekend, it’s time for a look back on  what might actually be the highest circulating (and most bizarre) Marvel Comic of all time with a Complete Oral History of Fastlane, from artist Gregg Schigiel, Editor Steve Behling, Head of Marvel Creative Services Mike Thomas, and Senior Vice President for Strategic Promotions and Advertising John Fraser.

READ MORE. OH SO MUCH MORE.

4/20 SPECIAL: A COMPLETE HISTORY OF ‘FASTLANE,’ MARVEL’S AMAZING ANTI-MARIJUANA COMIC

By Chris Sims

If you were reading Marvel Comics in 1999, you read Fastlane. For four solid months, it was absolutely unavoidable, an eight-page anti-marijuana insert that would pop up right in the middle of every single Marvel Comic to let you know about the dangers of weed, a drug that was glorified in the media and would lead users to a dangerous world of addiction and deadly hallucinations that was so over the top even the producers of Dragnetthought that maybe they should tone it down a little. And if you’re a certain kind of person who was reading Marvel Comics in the ’90s, you actually kind of love it.

I mean, I do. And that’s why, with 4/20 and all its attendant celebrations coming up this weekend, it’s time for a look back on  what might actually be the highest circulating (and most bizarre) Marvel Comic of all time with a Complete Oral History of Fastlanefrom artist Gregg Schigiel, Editor Steve Behling, Head of Marvel Creative Services Mike Thomas, and Senior Vice President for Strategic Promotions and Advertising John Fraser.

READ MORE. OH SO MUCH MORE.

A TOUCHING CAST PHOTO FROM THE JUSTICE LEAGUE MOVIE THAT NEVER WAS
Greg Van Borssum, a stuntman on the upcoming Mad Max reboot Fury Road, posted a photo to his Facebook page last month that offers a previously unseen glimpse of the cast and crew of the never-made 2008 Justice League movie.

Justice League: Mortal was meant to film in 2008 under George Miller, co-writer and director of the Mad Max franchise, including Fury Road. Justice League: Mortal never began filming, possibly because of the Writers Guild Strike of 2007-2008, but the photo reveals that Miller at least got as far as bringing his cast together.


Justice League: Mortal would have starred Armie Hammer as Batman, D.J. Cotrona as Superman, Megan Gale as Wonder Woman, Adam Brody as Flash, Common as Green Lantern, Hugh Keays-Byrne as Martian Manhunter, Santiago Cabrera as Aquaman, Teresa Palmer as Talia Al Ghul, Zoe Kasan as Iris Allen, and Jay Baruchel as the villain of the piece, Maxwell Lord.
READ MORE

A TOUCHING CAST PHOTO FROM THE JUSTICE LEAGUE MOVIE THAT NEVER WAS

Greg Van Borssum, a stuntman on the upcoming Mad Max reboot Fury Road, posted a photo to his Facebook page last month that offers a previously unseen glimpse of the cast and crew of the never-made 2008 Justice League movie.

Justice League: Mortal was meant to film in 2008 under George Miller, co-writer and director of the Mad Max franchise, including Fury RoadJustice League: Mortal never began filming, possibly because of the Writers Guild Strike of 2007-2008, but the photo reveals that Miller at least got as far as bringing his cast together.

Justice League: Mortal would have starred Armie Hammer as Batman, D.J. Cotrona as Superman, Megan Gale as Wonder Woman, Adam Brody as Flash, Common as Green Lantern, Hugh Keays-Byrne as Martian Manhunter, Santiago Cabrera as Aquaman, Teresa Palmer as Talia Al Ghul, Zoe Kasan as Iris Allen, and Jay Baruchel as the villain of the piece, Maxwell Lord.

READ MORE

X-MEN FILM DIRECTOR BRYAN SINGER ACCUSED OF SEXUAL ABUSE
The director Superman Returns and three X-Men films including the forthcoming Days of Future Past, director Bryan Singer has been accused of sexually abusing a 17-year-old male in 1999. In a lawsuit filed in civil court in Hawaii on Wednesday, plaintiff Michael F. Egan III alleged that Singer “manipulated his power, wealth, and position in the entertainment industry to sexually abuse and exploit the underage Plaintiff through the use of drugs, alcohol, threats, and inducements.”READ MORE

X-MEN FILM DIRECTOR BRYAN SINGER ACCUSED OF SEXUAL ABUSE

The director Superman Returns and three X-Men films including the forthcoming Days of Future Past, director Bryan Singer has been accused of sexually abusing a 17-year-old male in 1999. In a lawsuit filed in civil court in Hawaii on Wednesday, plaintiff Michael F. Egan III alleged that Singer “manipulated his power, wealth, and position in the entertainment industry to sexually abuse and exploit the underage Plaintiff through the use of drugs, alcohol, threats, and inducements.”

READ MORE